Freeman Dyson on the Soil as a Carbon Sink

Renowned physicist and mathematician Professor Freeman Dyson is a liberal. Nevertheless, he rejects climate alarmism and alleged “scientific consensus” that increase in the air CO2 concentration from burning fossil fuels and other human activities is harmful, or causes dangerous global warming.  But he has found and published a solution to this non-problem about ten years ago.  The solution is accumulating extra CO2 in the top soil.  Those who considered increase of CO2 in the atmosphere to be a problem had plenty of time to discuss, test, and start implementing his proposal. See Edge.org, August 9, 2007 (9,800 words).

Quotes:

My first heresy says that all the fuss about global warming is grossly exaggerated. Here I am opposing the holy brotherhood of climate model experts and the crowd of deluded citizens who believe the numbers predicted by the computer models. …

The number that I ask you to remember is the increase in thickness, averaged over one half of the land area of the planet, of the biomass that would result if all the carbon that we are emitting by burning fossil fuels were absorbed. The average increase in thickness is one hundredth of an inch per year. …

To stop the carbon in the atmosphere from increasing, we only need to grow the biomass in the soil by a hundredth of an inch per year. …

Consider a possible future, with China continuing to develop an industrial economy based largely on the burning of coal, and the United States deciding to absorb the resulting carbon dioxide by increasing the biomass in our topsoil. …

(h/t Anthony Watts)

About Freeman Dyson, Professor Emeritus of Physics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University: Member of the National Academy of Sciences, Fellow of the Royal Society, Member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Foreign Associate of the Academy of Sciences of France, National Academy of Sciences dei Quaranta of Italy; member of  American Physical Society, German Physical Society, Phi Beta Kappa Society; a former member of NASA Advisory Council, a former chairman of Federation of American Scientists; a winner of Danny Heineman Prize, Lorentz Medal, Hughes Medal, Max Planck Medal,  (1969), J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize, Harvey Prize, Wolf Prize in Physics, Andrew Gemant Award, Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, Britannica Award, Matteucci Medal, Oersted Medal, Enrico Fermi Award from United States Department of Energy, Wright Prize, Antonio Feltrinelli International Prize (Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Italy), Lewis Thomas Prize (Rockefeller University), Joseph A. Burton Forum Award (American Physical Society), Templeton Prize,  etc.

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